34 Things I Learned on the Boston Freedom Trail

I shared with you yesterday that we went to NH to celebrate my in-laws 50th Wedding Anniversary.

As a last minute decision, we did something we have been talking about doing forever.

We went to Boston and walked the Freedom Trail.

So, if you will bear with me for another picture heavy post, I thought I would share with you the 34 Things I Leaned on the Freedom Trail.

Yup, I said 34.

First, I do have to admit, that we did skip the beginning.  We only had one day and we still had to drive home, so we had to make choices.

We started at Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market.

So here it goes, I leaned that…

1. Lobsters can be quite HUGE!

Boston's Freedom Trail

2. There is nothing like walking on cobblestone streets, however, when wearing sandals, be careful not to catch the high ones.  Wish I had had some warning on that one.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

3. Sometimes its okay to be somewhere where no one knows your name except your family.

Boston's Freedom Trail

4. Next time we will use more Marriott points and stay at this one down on the water instead of the one with the scary and unsafe feeling elevator.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

5.  You are not allowed to take pictures inside Paul Revere’s house.  It was pretty awesome running your hand on the banister knowing that he once did so as well.  Oh, and did you know he had 16 children?  Wow.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

6.  Boston is all about details and keeping it authentic.  Wanted to take these right home with me.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

7.  There is a brick line (or red painted line) leading you all the way through the Trail.  Took us a bit to figure that out since we cut down by the port (totally worth it for the sea breezes alone).  Avoid feeling foolish like us by not figuring that part out for a bit.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

8. Paul Revere’s name is perfect.  He is greatly “revered” and respected in this town.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

9.  There is nothing wrong with learning some on a vacation trip.  We also picked up some activities books to learn more (me included!).

 Boston's Freedom Trail

10.  Some people were born to have a job where they pretend they are from another century and talk like it is the 1700’s right now.  Very passionate about his craft.

Boston's Freedom Trail

11. The Freedom Trail is filled with visual gems for a home blogger.  Again, wanted to take it home with me.  All of it.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

12. I should have bought this ornament when I saw it instead of assuming I would see it again towards the end of the trail (less to carry you know).  Loved all its imperfections.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

13. Even when celebrating the accomplishments of the Revolutionary War, there is room to respectfully and beautifully pay tribute to our current heroes at war.

Boston's Freedom Trail

14. If you attended The Old North Church back in the day, it was really expensive and you had to “buy” your pew section.  The best ones cost the equivalent of $25,000.  Crazy stuff.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

15. Directly across from The Old North Church is a small Italian bakery and coffee shop.  Go.  I meant it.  Best iced coffee and desserts I think I have ever had.  This is the North End and it is authentically Italian.  This was further proven by the fact that it was filled with old Italian men and few tourists.  If you can get the front table, with the open side doors – do it.  The most glorious breeze even on a hot day.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

16. Old cemeteries aren’t creepy.  They are filled with information and history.  It is amazing what short lives people lived compared to now.

Boston's Freedom Trail

17.  If you go the USS Constitution Museum, the signs are not for sale no matter how much you wish they were.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

18. Old ships are extremely cool and amazing.  To have built this amazing specimen in the time that they did – truly art.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

19. More detail used to be paid to things.  Even canons.  So beautiful – even for a destruction device.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

20. Turns out my fear discomfort of enclosed spaces does not apply if I can see daylight, feel air and know where the exits are.  I even made it down two floors.  However, I would never survive these sleeping arrangements, even on dry land.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

21. Turns out more modern battleships have amazing sinks.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

22. I am pretty sure I am the only one on the ship taking pictures of how beautiful the rope is.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

23. It is hard for me to get out “estate sale” mode.  I didn’t understand why there were no prices on the basket, typewriters or large lock.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

24. I am wicked (got use it, its Boston after all) thankful I never had to be operated on here.  Or have a splinter pulled for that matter.

Boston's Freedom Trail

25. I will never complain about where I do my laundry.  And to quote the young men who came in after me: Guy 1: “Wow, this would SUCK.”  Guy 2: “Indeed”.  Couldn’t have said it better.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

26. Take every opportunity to hear the stories and perspective of our Hero Veterans.  Such a cool guy.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

27.  If you had a really big room, this would be the best coffee table ever.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

28. This could have been the sweetest man ever.  He has been working on this particular ship for 5 months.  He used to build planes.  Sweetest smile, cute as button.  Wanted to take him home too.

Boston's Freedom Trail

29. It is super fun to see your daughter start to be interested in photography and even be willing to lay down on the ground to get the shot she wanted.

Boston's Freedom Trail

Next two shots are hers.  Pretty cool.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

30. Because of your fear discomfort of enclosed spaces, it is okay if after 75 stairs to decide climbing to the top is not your thing (no natural light, no visual of exits!) it is okay to turn around and let them go with out you.  Plus, according to Hubby, your quads will thank you.

Boston's Freedom Trail

31. It is okay to see someone pose their children in a shot, and follow up and copy the same shot.

Boston's Freedom Trail

32. If at the end of the trail, you spot an empty cab – it is worth every penny of the $11 to take you back to your starting point.   It is a long, long walk.   Plus, your daughter may be excited because it is her first cab ride.

Boston's Freedom Trail

33. Fenway Stadium is not on the Freedom Trail.  It should be. Go Sox.

Boston's Freedom Trail

34. And the final thing I learned is always show appreciation to people who are willing take your picture as a group shot instead of continuing to try and fit everyone’s face in on your iPhone.

 Boston's Freedom Trail

That sums it up!  How about you, have you ever been.  Totally a “must do”

Thanks for reading!

About Finding Home

Welcome to Finding Home Farms where we share our favorite DIY and decorating ideas and inspiration. We believe your home should be a reflection of you and your family. Our blog is the story of our journey - and what we find along the way. Thanks for joining us!

Leave Us A Comment

7 thoughts on “34 Things I Learned on the Boston Freedom Trail”

Comments

  1. I’ve never been, but I feel now as if I have! What a great photo tour! Thank you so much for taking the time to share this and what you learned. I just love it! I will admit to you that the picture of the dog tags made me tear up. My son was a Marine, and such things always get to me, but seeing so many hanging there in tribute along with your caption was just perfect. You have a great eye and inspired me with the cool history you shared! I loved those signs too!
    Liz

  2. Loved looking at your pictures. Went there with Richie on his 8th grade class trip so it was a trip down memory lane. I love Boston! (But just not the Red Sox) 🙂